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Review: TC Electronic Röttweiler + The Dreamscape

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Kitarablogi.com – Finland's premier Guitar and Bass blog

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TC Electronic’s Röttweiler-distortion (current street price in Finland 129 €) specializes in brutal distortion sounds, and doesn’t waste any time on sissy stuff.

The gain control takes you from quite a lot of distortion to complete über-Metal-mayhem – so don’t go looking for besuited and well-behaved Blues-tones here. The Voice-switch gives you two different shades of brutal: One selection is fatter in the mid-range for more classic Hard Rock and Metal stuff, while the other selection gives you the scooped out tones favoured in many contemporary styles. The pedal also offers bass and treble controls for fine-tuning your tone.

The TC Electronic Röttweiler is a brilliant tool for the Metal-aficionado, which turns any amp into a high-gain monster stack.

Here are three sound clips, which Miloš Berka recorded using a seven-string Schecter into a clean amp setting:

Röttweiler off

Röttweiler on, voice off

Röttweiler on, voice on

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Review: Boss RC-3 Loop Station

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Kitarablogi.com – Finland's premier Guitar and Bass blog

The speed of technological progress in the field of musical equipment is simply astounding. Boss have introduced their new, extremely compact looper pedal – the RC-3 Loop Station – which offers a whopping three hours of sampling time in 44.1 kHz/16-bit linear wave-format.

One of the RC-3’s coolest features is the way the pedal instantly synchs up loops that were recorded “freehand” (without a click, that is) with its internal drum machine. Everything happens on-the-fly without missing a beat.

The Boss RC-3 can also be used to “fly in” one-shot samples into your performance. This means you could fly in a dive-bomb sample while playing a guitar solo on a stop-tail guitar, for example.

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The RC-3 is a great looper with many different possible uses. Apart from looping and the flying in of sounds, one possible application could be as a sturdy playback machine for one-man acts or clinicians…

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Review: Boss FB-2 Feedbacker/Booster

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Kitarablogi.com – Finland's premier Guitar and Bass blog

The Boss FB-2 Feedbacker/Booster (current price in Finland: 105 €) is a specialised tool to help you achieve musical feedback at moderate volume levels. Additionally this pedal also functions as a powerful level booster. The FB-2 is a typical Boss-pedal, from the classic sturdy cast-metal casing to its four control knobs, which offer separate level controls for the booster and the feedback sections, as well as an overall tone control and the booster’s Character knob.

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The booster is turned on and off by stepping shortly onto the footswitch. For feedback you need to hold the switch down continuously.

I couldn’t find any precise specifications for the amount of gain on offer here, but my educated guess would be at at least 12 dB. Apart from the different options afforded by the FB-2’s tone and Character controls, the booster’s “sound” and the way it interacts with your rig is…

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Review: Boss BC-2 Combo Drive

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Kitarablogi.com – Finland's premier Guitar and Bass blog

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The legendary Vox AC30 was the first successful British guitar amplifier.

Originally the 2 x 12 -combo had been designed especially for The Shadows, aiming at a louder and cleaner tone than what their old AC15s could provide. It didn’t take long, though, for experimentally inclined guitarists to realise they could get nicely toasted drive sounds out of the amp, especially when using a distortion- or treble booster -pedal in front of the combo.

In addition to the Shadows, famous AC30-users are (or have been) The Beatles, The Kinks, Queen, Bryan Adams, Tom Petty and U2’s The Edge.

The famous combo’s greatest drawback – in its original guise – is the lack of a master volume control, meaning meaty, overdriven tones only could be had at great volume.

Luckily, these days we have the wonders of digital amp modelling at our disposal, which means classic tones without the need…

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Review: Akai Chorus and Analog Delay

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Kitarablogi.com – Finland's premier Guitar and Bass blog

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A chorus effect is produced by splitting a signal in two, and then slightly delaying one half (by less than 50 ms) and adding a tad cyclical pitch modulation to it. At the output both the dry and the effected half are summed, resulting in a lush, shimmering effect, which at times may even sound like two instruments playing at once.

The Akai Chorus (current street price in Finland: 69 €) is an old-school analogue effect. This pedal doesn’t use A/D-converters and digital processing, deriving its tones instead from a good old condenser circuit, as well as an analogue LFO. Most anoraks feel that this is the only way to fly when it comes to chorus-pedals, even if an analogue chorus always tends to contain a tiny amount of hiss, not found in modern digital equivalents.

As with all Akai Analog Custom Shop -pedals, the Chorus also…

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